SOME EXPLICIT POLAROIDS: WANT. NEED. LOVE. HATE. LUST. LIES. DENIAL. OR LACK OF.

SOME EXPLICIT POLAROIDS: WANT. NEED. LOVE. HATE. LUST. LIES. DENIAL. OR LACK OF.

 

Q: What dominates your mind on a daily basis?

Coffee? Tonight’s dinner? The five kilos you need to - slash - should lose? Quite possibly.


A: The real answer is sex.



In every shape or form, The Basement Theatre was overflowing with sex on Friday night. And far better entertainment that any strip club can offer. You may be familiar with the work of playwright Mark Ravenhill in his internationally acclaimed work Shopping and F**king from the late 90’s, and once again he has sought to undo the viewer’s social buttons.


Exploring the guts of socialism, the play intellectually toys with the dingier, drug fuelled side of London’s party culture as we are taken through a 90 minute dance with death. Pants off to the talented cast (Andrew Ford, Roberto Nascimento, Edward Newborn, Lucy McCammon, Rashmi Pilapitiya & Robert Tripe), as they aggressively push (and thrust at) the boundaries of what should and should not be revealed to the public eye. At times, the play was so intense I felt consumed by it all and sex was more in my face than on my mind.


The crux of it all, lies around the six emotionally damaged characters grappling with the past, the present and the overwhelming realities of the future. Recently released from jail, Nick flails about the stage as he desperately attempts to win back the attention of his former girlfriend Helen. He does this brilliantly and somewhat shamelessly as his desperation takes shape in the act of removing clothes as much as possible.


Helen manages to hold the play and narrative together perfectly, yet still convey the sensitive feelings she has around her regrets of the past and her determination for her future. Then there’s Victor, the “I love my Body” Russian go-go dancer who preens and parades his body and tantrums around his AIDs infused lover Tim.


To complete the screwed up love-triangle is Nadia – an abused and trampled hooker, who convincingly suffers from her work on the street. She teases the audience well with her saucy underwear and has us all playing violins in the background with her relentless, soul-destroying search for inner peace.


Each character held its own, to create an engaging and eventful theatre piece. Despite the crudeness of the play, at a high level the underlying themes were tightly woven throughout to provoke one’s thought and mind and reaction.


If your Friday night was spent just thinking about sex, you might as well get down to The Basement for the real deal.



By Olivia Young


Some Explicit Polaroids is on at The Basement Theatre until Saturday 23rd June.

 

 


 

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